Downsizing Your Library of Books

Downsizing Your Library of Books

If you love books, it’s hard to think about parting with them, but when they start overflowing the book shelves, it’s time to do some purging! Most books will fall into one of these categories:

• books for show (those with pretty covers, coffee table books, etc.)
• books you have read and enjoyed
• books you haven’t read but want to
• books you use from time to time
• and college textbooks!

Let’s start from the bottom, if you graduated over 40 years ago and you haven’t looked at your college text books in all that time, it’s probably safe to get rid of them.

For books you have read, ask yourself if you will ever read them again, if the answer is no, offer them to a friend or donate them to an organization that can re-sell them as a fund-raiser.

Keep the books you still want to read some day, the books you use and, as long as you have room for them, keep the pretty books that are just for show, but you will probably feel a great deal of relief from getting rid of the clutter.

Aging In Place

Aging In Place

The Center for Disease Control defines “aging in place” as the ability to live in one’s own home and community safely, independently, and comfortably, regardless of age, income, or ability level. Research conducted by AARP shows that 88% of Americans want to age in place, if you are part of that 88%, what accommodations have you made to prepare your home?

Some features of aging in place design include:

• Wheelchair roll under areas
• Pull out work surfaces
• Lowered countertops and stoves
• Tilted bathroom mirrors
• Shower benches
• Hand held shower fixtures
• Grab bars and handrails
• Wheelchair ramps

Senior Moves can help you age in place gracefully. For more information call 941-924-2842.

Don’t Let Old Photos Go To Waste

Don’t Let Old Photos Go To Waste

One of the saddest things I’ve seen is a trash can filled to overflowing with old photos and slides. What would anyone do with photos of people they don’t know? Often people assume that they may be of no use.

This often happens when adult children or other family members need to clear out the home of a senior, and no one knows who the people are in the pictures. Who is that sweet-looking old woman in old-fashioned dress? Does anyone recognize that handsome young soldier? Are those adorable children building a snowman possibly some adults we know?

What about your own photos? Have you taken the time to identify the subjects in them? You know, at some point, all those who might remember them will no longer be around, as hard as it is to think about.

You have the ability to leave your children and grandchildren with some real family history, or with a pile of useless photographs. Spend a short period of time each day until the job is done. You may even want to jot down some interesting background information about the occasion of the photo-taking. But each word that you write and each person that you identify will be a gift to your family.